5 Ways to Support a Nursing Mama When She Visits Your Home

nursing mama

This month marks my 20th month of breastfeeding between my two children. In that time, I’ve nursed just about everywhere imaginable – airports, cars, parks, restaurants and one of my personal favorites, Nordstrom. Can I get an “amen” for their fantastic mother’s rooms? All those public places used to worry me when it came to nursing, but now, it seems the most awkward place I end up feeding my baby is in a friend or acquaintance’s home. Why? Because I don’t want to make you feel uncomfortable and although I’ll always place my baby’s need for a meal first, those around me are in my realm of concern too.

So, how can you support a nursing mama when she visits your home? Here’s a few ideas to start your wheels turning …

  1. If you have breastfed, you’ll recall your incessant need for water and lots of it! When a nursing mama is in your home be sure to offer her a big glass of water and keep the refills coming.
  2. While breastfeeding a mama will burn approximately 650 calories each day to produce 25 ounces of milk. To keep up her energy and supply, offer her a nutritious snack – something heavy in protein, iron or calcium.
  3. When a nursing mama arrives at your home, be sure to let her know she is welcome to nurse wherever she and her baby are comfortable. Depending on the little one’s age, they may become distracted when trying to eat in a social setting. To assist, have a quiet room with a comfy chair available as it might be the perfect solution for a distracted baby.
  4. All mamas, whether nursing or not, carry their babies for hours each day. Sometimes it is nice to have a break so don’t hesitate to open your arms and offer to snuggle, rock or walk with the baby. Just the same, if the mama seems to hold her little one close, don’t push for that snuggle. Just offer and take the mama’s lead.
  5. Have a little stash of baby or nursing items tucked away – a small blanket, nursing pads and a burp cloth would be a good start.

Have you had a good experience breastfeeding in someone else’s home? A bad one? What other things would make you feel supported when nursing in someone’s home?

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