1.7 Million Summer Infant Video Monitors RECALLED

Before you freak out that almost 2 million video baby monitors are being recalled, we want to tell you that it is a recall for new labels and instructions on the monitors.  The monitors itself don’t need to be fixed or sent back! Two strangulation deaths prompted Summer Infant to voluntarily recall all their video monitors with cords to provide new on-product labels and instructions.

While it may be common sense to many, this is a great opportunity to remind parents of the hazards of putting a device  with a cord (such as a baby monitor) within reach of a baby.   Because of a serious strangulation risk, parents and caregivers should never these corded cameras, corded baby monitors or any cords for that matter within three feet of a crib.

So, here’s the recall information:

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), in cooperation with Summer Infant Inc., of Woonsocket, R.I., is announcing the voluntary recall to provide new on product label and instructions for about 1.7 million video baby monitors with electrical cords. The cords can present a strangulation hazard to infants and toddlers if placed too close to a crib. Because of this serious strangulation risk, parents and caregivers should never place these and other corded cameras within three feet of a crib.

Over the past year CPSC and the firm have received reports of two strangulation deaths of infants with the electrical cords of Summer Infant video baby monitors. In March 2010 a 10-month old girl from Washington, D.C. strangled in her crib in the electrical cord of a Summer Infant video monitor. The monitor camera had been placed on top of the crib rail.

In November 2010 CPSC received a report of a six-month old boy from Conway, S.C., who strangled in the electrical cord of a baby monitor placed on the changing table attached to the crib. In January 2011 CPSC learned the product involved was a Summer Infant video baby monitor.

CPSC and the firm are also aware of a near strangulation incident in which a 20-month old boy from Pittsburg, Pa. was found in his crib with the camera cord wrapped around his neck. The Summer Infant monitor camera was mounted on the wall, but the child was still able to reach the cord. He was freed from the cord without serious injury.

Summer Infant has initiated a campaign to provide new on-product labels for electric cords and instructions to consumers with the recalled video monitors distributed between January 2003 and February 2011. The baby monitors were sold at major retailers, mass merchandisers, and juvenile products stores nationwide for between $60 and $300. They were sold in more than 40 different models, including handheld, digital, and color video monitors. All video monitors include both the camera (placed in the baby’s room) and the hand held device (some models have two hand-held devices) that enable the caregiver to see and/or hear the baby from a specific distance. The brand “Summer” is found on the product.

The product was manufactured in China.

CPSC and Summer Infant urge parents to immediately check the location of the video monitors, including cameras mounted on the wall, and all electric cords to make sure the cords are out of arm’s reach of their child. Consumers should contact Summer Infant toll-free at (800) 426-8627 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visit the firm’s website at www.summerinfant.com/Home/Product-Recall.aspx to receive a new permanent electric cord warning label about the strangulation risk and revised instructions about how to safely mount camera and keep cords out of child’s reach.

In October 2010 CPSC issued a safety alert warning consumers that there had been six reports of strangulation in baby monitor cords since 2004. Since that alert the number of death reports has risen to seven. CPSC has revised the safety alert Infants Can Strangle in Baby Monitor Cords.

HAZARDS

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Baby Gizmo founder Hollie Schultz is the proud mom of three adorable kids. This certified CPS (Child Passenger Safety) Tech and baby gear expert is the host of the Baby Gizmo video reviews giving moms the inside look at baby products before they purchase them. Hollie is also the co-author of The Baby Gizmo Buying Guide. A former resident of Los Angeles, she and her family now live in North Carolina where she is having a blast designing and decorating her new home.

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4 Comments on "1.7 Million Summer Infant Video Monitors RECALLED"

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Bree
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I have the Summer Infant Baby Touch 2 monitor to watch over my 2-year-old son. It works great so far and I even wrote a review for it. And I never place the camera too close to him so there is no way he can touch the cord. Anyway, a baby monitor with long cord is really risky.
Thanks for sharing.

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Lindsey M.
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I have one of these monitors and it is wonderful. I LOVE being able to check on my baby girl without interrupting her. I have used it her entire life and she is now 14 months old. I have it mounted to the wall, with the cord tacked to the wall every six inches, all the way to the outlet. This is common sense, folks. What in the world were these parents thinking?! I am so grateful for this product and I am offended that because of consumer irresponsibility, they have had to place a recall. My next point is,… Read more »
Sari P.
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It is absolutely awful and horrifying that this has happened to these kids and their families. I don’t think I would ever recover if anything like this happened to my child. With that said, why oh why would a parent put a cord on the rail of a crib or the changing table attached to the crib or anywhere else that a child can reach it??!?!?! I know not to take a cord and wrap it around my neck, but babies, infants, toddlers, etc are the most curious individuals and they don’t know the risk with anything. It is our… Read more »
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